The Measuring Access to Justice Research Team is an interdisciplinary team that includes lawyers and social scientists (psychologists and victimologists) with the aim of developing a standard methodology for measuring the costs and quality of paths to justice.

 

Maurits Barendrecht

Maurits Barendrecht

Maurits Barendrecht

Maurits Barendrecht (1956) practiced law at a major Dutch law firm (1982-1997) and is professor of Private Law at Tilburg University since 1992. He studies dispute systems (legal procedures, negotiation processes, ADR, informal dispute mechanisms) from an interdisciplinary perspective. He systematically looks for knowledge from economics, psychology, organisation theory, negotiation theory, and conflict studies that may be integrated with best practices, in order to improve dispute systems so that they serve the interests of the people that rely on them in a better way. An important – but little studied – element of dispute systems are objective criteria: simple rules of thumb that can be used to solve distributive issues.�His research takes places within Tisco (Tilburg Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies of Civil Law and Conflict Resolution Systems), see�www.uvt.nl/tisco. For more information click here

 

 

Martin Gramatikov

Martin Gramatikov

Martin Gramatikov

Martin is the head of measurement and evaluation at HiiL. He has M.A. in Law from the University of Sofia and Ph.D. degree in Political Science from the same University. He also studied in the George Washington University�s School of Business and Public Administration. His main research interests are in the fields of access to justice, measuring justice, legal needs, insolvency law and tort law. Dr. Gramatikov specializes in the design and implementation of empirical legal studies, combining qualitative and quantitative methods in the study of legal phenomena. Currently he leads the MA2J team which develops a methodology for measuring the costs and quality of access to justice. The aim of the project is to turn the methodology into valid and reliable internationally applicable tool for benchmarking justice processes.�For more information email: martin(dot)gramatikov(at)hiil(dot)org

 

 

Jin Ho Verdonschot

Jin Ho Verdonschot

Jin Ho Verdonschot

Jin Ho joined HiiL in 2012. He helps courts and other justice sector organisations to update and innovate their procedures and justice processes. He deeply believes that we can develop user-friendly interfaces of the justice system. This is also reflected in his PhD study that focused in an innovative process for developing user-friendly legal rules that guide people on distributive issues (sharing rules).  Before joining TISCO in 2007, Jin Ho Verdonschot built experience as an innovative and socially engaged entrepreneur. His current research puts emphasis on the most urgent justice needs of individuals.

His PhD research focuses on legal rules and other distributive norms as a key element of dispute systems. From the perspective of parties, some legal rules better facilitate dispute resolution than others and are more useful to solve distributive issues. He examines what suitable legal rules are and how to develop and deliver these, by taking an interdisciplinary approach (negotiation theory, social psychology, behavioral economics, information technology).�For more information email: jinho(dot)verdonschot(at)hiil(dot)org

 

 

Corry van Zeeland

Corry van Zeeland

Corry van Zeeland

Corry van Zeeland is researcher at, and managing director of TISCO (Tilburg Institute for Interdisciplinary Studies of Civil Law, and Conflict Resolution Systems, Tilburg University). She is currently working on a PhD regarding the needs of non-professional (civil) justice users, and the way(s) dispute resolution systems could be (re)designed to meet these needs. Corry has a special interest in preventive justice and early dispute resolution, user empowerment, and user-focused service and system designs. In particular, she focuses on user-driven mechanisms, such as choice, voice, and co-design as means to re-orientate dispute resolution systems (and the actors operating it) towards the needs, strengths, and capabilities of ordinary people.

In addition, Corry specializes in facilitating complex interactive processes. Together with TISCO colleagues, Corry has worked on large multiparty consensus building projects, such as the project resulting in the Code of Conduct for Handling Personal Injury Claims (2006) and the Program on Accessible and Sustainable Legal Aid, which results have for a large part been adopted by the Dutch parliament (2008/9).�For more information click�here